Reflections on early historical thinking

Dr Nathan Wise Associate Professor in Public and Applied History University of New England At UNE, teaching commences in this first week of March for our Trimester One units. In our foundation history unit, HINQ100: What is History?, there is a remarkable blend of students with diverse backgrounds and experiences. There is the typically large group of … Read on

UNESCO World heritage-listed Hyde Park Barracks reopens

More than 200 years old and a site of exceptional significance, this fascinating building holds the key to understanding the convict origins of colonial Australia, its impact on Aboriginal nations, and the shelter and care of immigrant and destitute women.

Fostering respect for public history and scholarly history

By Associate Professor Nathan Wise, Public and Applied History, University of New England (UNE). As Associate Professor of Public and Applied History at the University of New England (UNE), I’m often asked to explain the differences between public and scholarly history. In my foundation unit HINQ100: What is History? we spend the first half of the … Read on

Australia’s Byzantine Trophy of War – Part 1

As discussed in Edition 8 of Traces Magazine, Timothy Carnovale dives into the trenches of World War I and examines the discovery of the Shellal Mosaic. Christopher Hitchens, an Anglo-American author and anti-theist, once exclaimed that those with the title ‘Reverend’ would be able to get away with anything. Senior Church of England Chaplain to … Read on

Oldest churches in Australia

In comparison to the rich and vast past in other nations, Australia is still considered to have a relatively short history. In saying this, Australia houses an abundance of religious churches that represent the multiculturalism we pride ourselves on. For the last 200 years, the country has accommodated a variety of religious congregations who created their … Read on

What does history study offer for future employment?

By Associate Professor Nathan Wise, Public and Applied History, University of New England (UNE). As university study has steadily become more accessible to Australians, the requirement for courses to emphasise the specific ‘workplace skills’ they impart and ‘employability’ aspects has also increased.  My particular views on the issue of employability stem from the career uncertainties … Read on

Finding Australia’s missing soldiers

In Edition 9 of Traces Magazine, Lambis Englezos discusses his search for hundreds of missing Australian soldiers in Fromelles. On 19 July 1916, almost 2000 Australian troops were killed when attempting to attack German trenches in Fromelles, France. Encompassing all those who were killed, unaccounted for, wounded or taken as prisoner, 5533 Australians were directly … Read on

On the immeasurable value of local historical expertise

As an undergraduate student in the early 2000s, one of my first original historical research projects involved documenting the history of a local war memorial. Being new to the idea of ‘archival research’, I approached my lecturer for advice, and they suggested that I start with the local historical society. As I stepped through the … Read on

Writing a non-boring family history

Here is your sneak peek to an upcoming article from Traces Edition 9. ‘Writing a non-boring family history’ written by Hazel Edwards dives into the world of uncovering your ancestor’s history and turning it into a piece of compelling writing. Have you discovered something captivating in your family history? Have you thought about sharing it? … Read on

The treasure in Trove

By Associate Professor Nathan Wise, Public and Applied History, University of New England (UNE). Over the past decade, Trove has risen to become one of the most valuable resources for Australian historians and genealogists. At face value it is an easy-to-use search engine that researchers can use to find resources relating to aspects of Australian … Read on

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