Sneak peek: Where Shadows Have Fallen – The descent of Henry Kendall

Thanks to our friends at Wakefield Press, here is a sneak peek into Where Shadows Have Fallen – The descent of Henry Kendall, written by Adrian Mitchell. When Henry Kendall, the leading Australian poet of his day, died in Sydney in 1882, obituaries appeared in papers and journals so promptly that they must have been … Read on

An estate steeped in history

Located in Longford, Tasmania, is one of the most historically important farming properties in Australia: the Woolmers Estate. Well preserved and maintained, with a wealth of artefacts, the estate remains one of Australia’s best glimpses into colonial history and life in 19th-century Tasmania. In 2010, it was one of 11 places awarded World Heritage status … Read on

A meat market with many lives

From its humble beginnings as a meat market in 1880, the Meat Market has become one of Melbourne’s main hubs for art and culture. Until 1874, the City Meat Market (where the current Queen Victoria Market is now) was where meat wholesaling took place. A group of butchers created their own Victoria Meat Market on … Read on

Birthday surprise from Gould Genealogy

If you are interested in history, you love the stories that are hidden in its depths. You love to look back over the centuries and you love the feeling when you discover old secrets, intriguing dramas, and new connections. As historians, we like to get inside the minds of our ancestors and explore what life … Read on

Sneak peek: Pendragon – The life of George Isaccs, colonial wordsmith

Thanks to our friends at Wakefield Press, here is a sneak peek into Pendragon – The life of George Isaacs, colonial wordsmith written by Anne Black. Youth and The Hesperus, 1825-1844 It may be too fanciful to presume, that every century has produced an average amount of genius, and that the superiority of one age … Read on

Need help with your family history journey?

The University of Strathclyde offers a world leading online Genealogical Studies Programme designed to help you with your family history journey, whether you are a beginner or at a more advanced level. The 8-week online genealogy classes are open for booking now, with topics including Family History Research, Genetic Genealogy and Using Technology in Your … Read on

Women Work for Victory in WWII

Discover more in ‘Women Work for Victory in WWII’, an online exhibition at Old Treasury Building from 15 August 2020. Prior to World War II, nursing was the only service role available for women. Manpower shortages, and pressure from women’s lobby groups finally brought about change in Australia. During 1941, new auxiliary services exclusive to … Read on

Remember Home: Rethinking Convict Histories

Written by Honey Dower, a PhD candidate in History at the University of Tasmania. A convict’s life did not start in the Australian colonies. Rather, this was what British authorities wanted convicts to believe: that their life in Britain was dead, and it was time to remake themselves on the other side of the world. … Read on

The Fantasy of the Past: Women’s History at the Cascade Female Factory

By Paige Gleeson, University of Tasmania. The site of the Cascade Female Factory is swamped in the cold shadows of autumn dusk long before the rest of the town. An inky blue mountain and steep hillsides lined with weatherboard houses encase what remains of the site. It was here in the early 1840s a group … Read on

The problem of anachronism – the case of Samuel Marsden

By Dr Matthew Allen, Lecturer in Historical Criminology, University of New England (UNE). In writing about the past, historians must be aware of the pitfalls of anachronism. It is impossible for historians to avoid having their judgement shaped by the times in which they write. However, historians should try to avoid judging the past by … Read on

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