Founders & Survivors Storylines new website is live. Explore Tasmania.

0 Posted by - 3 May 2013 - Feature stories

Explore all 21 Lifelines and immerse yourself in Mugsheets where you can find records for 69,669 Tasmanian convicts – and for many of them, using identity records – create a realistic face using our Facemaker Identikit tool.

Founders and Survivors Storylines tells an extraordinary story about the making of modern Australia based on the world heritage-listed convict records of Tasmania.

Go to Lifelines to explore a sample of the convict lives, told in film, song and image.

Go to Mugsheets to search, connect and share with the 70,000 men, women and children transported to Van Diemen’s Land. Here you will find records for 69,669 Tasmanian convicts. You can search them by name, police number, trade and crime. You can also filter your search using voyage data. Identity records can be used to create a realistic face using the Facemaker tool.

Founders & Survivors Storylines

Founders & Survivors Storylines

2 Comments

  • avatar
    Scott Seymour 26 September 2013 - 12:23 pm Reply

    The section in “Life Lines”, “First In The Colony”, needs to be corrected. The 49 people didn’t arrive on the 9th of Sept. The first ship to Risdon Cove, “The Lady Nelson” arrived on the 7th Sept. 1803, followed by Bowen and Martha on the 11th, on board the ship “Albion”.

    Lt. David Collins arrived on the ship “Ocean” not the “Calcutta”, and although he didn’t like the location, it wasn’t Bowen’s choice, Bowen was ordered to establish a settlement at Risdon Cove by Gov. King (NSW).

  • avatar
    Scott Seymour 26 September 2013 - 12:31 pm Reply

    Sorry….that should have been, ‘the 49 people didn’t arrive on the 8th of Sept.”….I wrote the 9th in error.

    From the Historical Records of Australia –

    “The date of Bowen’s settlement has been dated from the arrival of the Lady Nelson, which has been accepted as on the 7th of September, or from the arrival of Bowen in the Albion, which has been accepted as on the 12th, on the authority of Bowen’s first despatch in which he stated that he arrived on Sunday, the 12th, five days after the brig”.

    “Bowen, however, was in error, as Sunday was the 11th and not the 12th, and the fact that the error was in the day of the month and not in the day of the week is proved by reference to the log of the Lady Nelson”.

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