The Fantasy of the Past: Women’s History at the Cascade Female Factory

By Paige Gleeson, University of Tasmania. The site of the Cascade Female Factory is swamped in the cold shadows of autumn dusk long before the rest of the town. An inky blue mountain and steep hillsides lined with weatherboard houses encase what remains of the site. It was here in the early 1840s a group … Read on

The problem of anachronism – the case of Samuel Marsden

By Dr Matthew Allen, Lecturer in Historical Criminology, University of New England (UNE). In writing about the past, historians must be aware of the pitfalls of anachronism. It is impossible for historians to avoid having their judgement shaped by the times in which they write. However, historians should try to avoid judging the past by … Read on

Australia’s oldest pubs

Australia is filled with a plethora of institutions that are seeping with rich history. With the continuous growth of infrastructure, visiting an alluring old-fashioned pub holds a dear place in the hearts of Australians. But which pub is Australia’s oldest? This has been a point of contention among historians and there are some conflicting opinions. … Read on

‘I want to break free!’ – The unconventional nature of public history

By Associate Professor Nathan Wise, Public and Applied History, University of New England (UNE). Back in January 2020, I wrote about the need to foster respect for both public and scholarly history. This emphasised the different objectives of the two broad approaches to historical practice, and I briefly touched on how scholarly history is typically … Read on

Full moon in Van Diemen’s Land

In 1790, the first exclusive female fleet of convicts arrived in Australia aboard the Lady Juliana. The women who were seen as the ‘most difficult’ were sent to forced labour camps so they could be educated on the ‘value of morality’. These camps were known as female factories, where they were punished in highly public … Read on

The Titanic’s forgotten Australian hero

In Edition 10 of Traces, Michael Adams writes about the Titanic’s forgotten Australian hero, a man named Albert Nichols. The Titanic’s sinking is a tragedy that has been the subject of countless books and movies – but Albert Nichols’s heroic role has been vastly overlooked. Albert was born in July 1864 on Lord Howe Island, … Read on

Historical correspondence in research

By Associate Professor Nathan Wise, Public and Applied History, University of New England (UNE) Historical correspondence, often thought of as letters, telegrams and postcards, are among the most useful types of source material for historians. Not only do they describe events and provide personal insights, but they also reveal much about the styles and conventions … Read on

Victoria’s Ghost Towns

As discussed in Traces Edition 10 by Sandy Guy, what were once booming towns across Victoria are now considered forgotten ghost towns. Whilst lacking a flourishing population, these eerie settlements boast history waiting to be discovered. Steiglitz: Located just 37 kilometres west of Geelong, Steiglitz’s population amounted to 2000 during its glory days in 1850. … Read on

COVID-19 and Historical Teaching and Research

By Associate Professor Nathan Wise, Public and Applied History, University of New England (UNE) In my last blog, I urged people to ‘come together to talk about the past’. Despite now needing to urge people to ‘stay at home’ and prevent the spread of COVID-19, the message remains the same, while the method/mode of ‘coming … Read on

Australia’s Byzantine Trophy of War – Part 2

In Edition 9 of Traces magazine, Timothy Carnovale, a Canberra-based writer and heritage consultant, examined the discovery of the Shellal Mosaic – believed to be the remains of a Byzantine-era basilica. In Part 1, the Shellal Mosaic was uncovered, now let’s see where the artefact ended up.  William Maitland Woods, senior chaplain of the Church of … Read on

Fostering respect for public history and scholarly history

By Associate Professor Nathan Wise, Public and Applied History, University of New England (UNE). As Associate Professor of Public and Applied History at the University of New England (UNE), I’m often asked to explain the differences between public and scholarly history. In my foundation unit HINQ100: What is History? we spend the first half of the … Read on

Australia’s Byzantine Trophy of War – Part 1

As discussed in Edition 8 of Traces Magazine, Timothy Carnovale dives into the trenches of World War I and examines the discovery of the Shellal Mosaic. Christopher Hitchens, an Anglo-American author and anti-theist, once exclaimed that those with the title ‘Reverend’ would be able to get away with anything. Senior Church of England Chaplain to … Read on

Oldest churches in Australia

In comparison to the rich and vast past in other nations, Australia is still considered to have a relatively short history. In saying this, Australia houses an abundance of religious churches that represent the multiculturalism we pride ourselves on. For the last 200 years, the country has accommodated a variety of religious congregations who created their … Read on

What does history study offer for future employment?

By Associate Professor Nathan Wise, Public and Applied History, University of New England (UNE). As university study has steadily become more accessible to Australians, the requirement for courses to emphasise the specific ‘workplace skills’ they impart and ‘employability’ aspects has also increased.  My particular views on the issue of employability stem from the career uncertainties … Read on

Finding Australia’s missing soldiers

In Edition 9 of Traces Magazine, Lambis Englezos discusses his search for hundreds of missing Australian soldiers in Fromelles. On 19 July 1916, almost 2000 Australian troops were killed when attempting to attack German trenches in Fromelles, France. Encompassing all those who were killed, unaccounted for, wounded or taken as prisoner, 5533 Australians were directly … Read on

On the immeasurable value of local historical expertise

As an undergraduate student in the early 2000s, one of my first original historical research projects involved documenting the history of a local war memorial. Being new to the idea of ‘archival research’, I approached my lecturer for advice, and they suggested that I start with the local historical society. As I stepped through the … Read on

Writing a non-boring family history

Here is your sneak peek to an upcoming article from Traces Edition 9. ‘Writing a non-boring family history’ written by Hazel Edwards dives into the world of uncovering your ancestor’s history and turning it into a piece of compelling writing. Have you discovered something captivating in your family history? Have you thought about sharing it? … Read on

Victorian ‘insanity’ in the 19th century

Why did Victoria have such a high rate of insanity? A new book illuminating the world of Melbourne’s early lunatic asylums recently won the Victorian Premier’s History Award. Jill Giese, clinical psychologist and author of The Maddest Place on Earth, spoke with Tracesabout an intriguing slice of colonial history. When I stumbled on an 1876 eyewitness account of … Read on

Join our mailing list