Readers’ Stories: Places in Time where history comes alive

Places can be portals to the past. From cemeteries and churches, gaols and asylums, to cottages and grand houses, discover where history has come alive for our readers in the latest edition of readers’ stories. Enjoy! Julie: My visit to Goulburn’s Mortis Street Cemetery with my Mum, brought a connection to my German ancestry more … Read on

Readers’ Stories: Tracking Australian Outlaws

Every week here at Inside History, we have the privilege of hearing dozens and dozens of wonderful stories from our readers’ family histories. These snapshots of long-gone people and bygone eras may not have made the history books, but they’re an important part of the fabric of Australian history. And they’re just too good to keep to … Read on

Readers’ stories: Chinese family history connections

Every week here at Inside History, we have the privilege of hearing dozens and dozens of wonderful stories from our readers’ family histories. These snapshots of long-gone people and bygone eras may not have made the history books, but they’re an important part of the fabric of Australian history. And they’re just too good to keep to … Read on

Tracing family in Eastern Europe: A heritage trip to the homeland

Tracing your grandparents’ long-lost relatives is one thing; journeying to their birthplace to meet with them first-hand is quite another. In her previous article for Inside History, Elisa Jakymin recounted how she and her sister Anna pieced together the story of her grandparents’ emigration from wartorn Eastern Europe and reconnected with the family members who’d remained. Here, she reflects on how the … Read on

Threads of the past: 1860s tapestry returned to its rightful owner

In 1860s Cambridgeshire, England, a girl named Elizabeth Bangle gave her cousin a beautiful tapestry. In 2017 Australia, the long-lost descendants of these two cousins reconnected — and the tapestry found its new, rightful home — thanks to some determined family history research and a call-out in Inside History. Christine Marshall Cox reports. Imagine my surprise before … Read on

From the family tree to an Honours degree: A UNE student on studying history online

While growing up, Karen Filewood helped her mother with the family tree; now she’s embarking on her own research projects as an Honours student at the University of New England (UNE). As part of her studies she’s pursued the topics that most fascinate her: from scouring lone grave burials in her local area, to investigating a tragic yet little-known nineteenth-century steamship disaster, and more. … Read on

Escaping postwar Eastern Europe: an Australian family history

Where to begin tracing your family history when your father has grown up with no known relatives beyond his immediate family — and knows little about his roots in wartorn Eastern Europe? Faced with this dilemma, Elisa Jakymin and her sister Anna reached out to an overseas genealogist for help. Here, she recounts the discoveries that followed, tracing the impact of World War … Read on

“Don’t forget me, cobber”: The Battle of Fromelles, 100 years on

One hundred years ago today, the Battle of Fromelles began – the first major battle fought by Australian troops on the Western Front. With 5,533 casualties in one night, it was the worst 24 hours in Australia’s military history. In this preview of our guide to retracing the Anzacs’ footsteps in the Somme, from our Winter 2016 edition, … Read on

The 1916 film The Battle of the Somme: Who is this mysterious hero?

It’s not often we get to see authentic footage from the First World War. Watch an excerpt of The Battle of the Somme, an iconic British film captured amidst the battle on the Western Front in 1916. Military expert Matt Lee, from the Imperial War Museums in Britain, explores one particular section of the film where a wounded soldier is … Read on

Australia’s forgotten colonial artist: The life and times of ST Gill

Colonial artist ST Gill portrayed 19th-century Australia’s bush, towns, goldfields and cities alike in vivid detail. Now, more than 200 of his artworks are on display at the National Library of Australia in Australian Sketchbook: Colonial Life and the Art of ST Gill. Curator Sasha Grishin traces the life and times of this unsung artist, and explains why his work … Read on

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